Game of Tiers: Ranking NBA Point Guards by Tiers

Ranking players by position (point guards etc.) in the NBA will always been a topic of debate.

As NBA fans, we constantly debate who the top 10 players for each position are, without ever coming to a shared list. One NBA fan has a player at the #1 spot of point guards while another NBA fan has that player as #2 etc etc. Then those fans keep on trying to convince each other that their respective choice is right. Eventually, both of the fans come to no conclusion and insist that they’re right.

What if however, we came up with a way to rank NBA players without having to argue who is better than the other. It is a fairly simple solution, instead of ranking them individually, we can rank them by tiers. Tier 1, 2, 3, 4, and tier 5.

For this edition, we rank the starting point guards of the NBA into 5 tiers.

Tier 1 is basically the elites. Point Guards that can do almost everything on the floor at a high level and can be a championship piece.

Tier 2 is almost similar to tier 1, the only difference being that tier 2 is a point guard that doesn’t really give a team a legit chance to win a championship.

The 3rd tier are the point guards that excel in some areas of the game but but lack that it factor put them at the tier 1 or 2 spot.

The fourth tier are the jack of all trades master of none. Point Guards that don’t do one thing spectacularly but are good enough to do most of the things.

Fifth tier are the specialists. Point Guards that start for one or two areas of the game.

Without further ado, here are the tiers of starting point guards (from tier 5 to tier 1)

Notes: For this article, we assume the Giannis Antetokounmpo plays SG (as listed in Basketball Reference) and Patrick Beverly plays SG as well.

Tier 5 – The specialists

Matthew Dellavedova, Milwaukee Bucks

Sergio Rodriguez, Philadelphia 76ers

Ricky Rubio, Minnesota Timberwolves

DJ Augustin, Orlando Magic

Deron Williams, Dallas Mavericks

Ty Lawson, Sacramento Kings

Photo Credits go to: David Zalubowski/Associated Press

Rubio is a tier 5 player because of his speciality in facilitating and defending. Photo via: David Zalubowski/Associated Press

Tier 4 – Jack of all trades

Tony Parker, San Antonio Spurs

Jeff Teague, Indiana Pacers

Jeremy Lin, Brooklyn Nets

Emmanuel Mudiay, Denver Nuggets

Derrick Rose, New York Knicks

Rajon Rondo, Chicago Bulls

Photo via: Chris Humphreys-USA TODAY Sports

Emmanuel Mudiay is adept at almost everything at a decent level, which gives him a tier 4 spot. Photo Via: Chris Humphreys-USA TODAY Sports

Tier 3 – Almost All-Star, not quite

Eric Bledsoe, Phoenix Suns

D’Angelo Russell, Los Angeles Lakers

George Hill, Utah Jazz

Reggie Jackson, Detroit Pistons

Jrue Holiday, New Orleans Pelicans

Dennis Schroder, Atlanta Hawks

Goran Dragic, Miami Heat

Photo via: Russ Isabella-USA TODAY Sports

George Hill has been playing very well for the Jazz. Almost all-star but not quite for Hill. Photo via: Russ Isabella-USA TODAY Sports

Tier 2 – Almost tier 1, but missing that championship factor

Kyle Lowry, Toronto Raptors

Isaiah Thomas, Boston Celtics

Kemba Walker, Charlotte Hornets

Mike Conley, Memphis Grizzlies

Damian Lillard, Portland Trailblazers

John Wall, Washington Wizards

Photo via: Ned Dishman/Getty Images

John Wall has a case for tier 1, but he needs to prove he can thrive in the playoffs consistently. Photo via: Ned Dishman/Getty Images

Tier 1 – The best of the best

James Harden, Houston Rockets

Chris Paul, Los Angeles Clippers

Russell Westbrook, Oklahoma City Thunder

Kyrie Irving, Cleveland Cavaliers

Stephen Curry, Golden State Warriors

Photo via: Mark D. Smith/USA TODAY Sports

Russell Westbrook is a clear tier 1 with his ability to almost everything on the floor at a very high level. Photo via: Mark D. Smith/USA TODAY Sports

Debatable tier placements:

Some of these players had a case for moving up a tier or even moving down a tier. For example, Kyrie Irving could have been placed at the tier 2 position but his play in the NBA Finals and his season so far gave him tier 1 rankings. John Wall also could’ve moved to tier 1 but needs to prove that he is capable of leading the Wizards to a great playoff run. Eric Bledsoe also had potential to be tier 2, but was put at tier 3 simply because his team is at the near bottom of the conference.

Stay tuned as we rank each position by tiers as well.

Featured Photo credits go to: ESPN, Getty Images

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